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Full text of "Collections of the Georgia Historical Society"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/collectionsofgeo16harw 



(;i:()K(;iA histohk alsoc iki v 

COLLECTIONS, VOLUME XVI 



(.onj ode rate Imprints at the 
Georgia Historical Society 

KI( HARD BARKSDAI.E HAHWELL 




SAVANNAH: THE SOCIETY, 1975 



A group c)t t'it'tyH)ne previously unrecorded ('oiilederate inipruits marks witli 
^^distinction the collection of Conlederate publications m ilie library ot the Ckorgia 
i.Historical Society. Thougli the collection at Hodgson Hall di)es not rank among the 
Miiost extensive groups of Confederate imprints, the presence of these unrecorded 
'pieces and other rare Confederate publications, many of them relating to (Georgia's 
' history during the Civil War. assures it the attention of historians of Georgia and of 
"^historians of the Confederacy. 

) It is not necessary to retell here the distinguished beginnings of the Georgia 
' Historical Society in 1839 or its leadership in collecting from repositories in 
England copies of materials relating to the state's colonial history. ^ As with many 
Georgia institutions, the bulk of its early endowment was rendered valueless by the 
Civil War. New endowment was slow in coming, and even now does not produce 
enough income to meet ongoing expenses. Nevertheless, a series of librarians has 
built and maintained an extensive library of books about the state and an equally 
extensive collection of Georgia manuscripts, the very materials from which even 
more books about the state will be compiled. 

With severely limited funds for the acquisition of books and with its primary 
interest the history of Georgia, there was little reason for the Society to place 
special emphasis in its library on Confederate materials. The Confederate Memorial 
and Literary Society had been founded to collect the wartime history of the whole 
South and early established its museum and library in Richmond. Who would 
preserve Georgia history if not the Georgia Historical Society? That function was 
the Society's natural specialization. 

Not that there was any lack of enthusiasm in Savannah for the Confederacy. 
Enthusiasm was there from the beginning, from the hoisting of the Liberty Flag in 
1860. And from the end of the Confederacy itself there was, and still is, enthusiasm 
for Confederate history. 

Long before Gone With the Wind sparked renewed interest in the Georgia of the 
Confederacy, even longer before the approach of the Civil War centennial made 
collecting everything and anything Confederate fashionable. Savannah was the 
home of four of the all-time leading collectors of Confederate imprints. Perhaps 
because these prominent Savannahians collected Confederate imprints for 
themselves, fewer than might otherwise have been the case found their way to 
Hodgson Hall. 

The first of these collectors was Charles Colcock Jones, Jr., ardent secessionist, 
first wartime mayor of Savannah, Confederate officer, and distinguished historian 
of Georgia. Jones collected Georgia and Confederate history, not imprints per sc: 
but he collected original materials whenever possible, and his library was rich in 
Confederate publications. The bulk of his Confederate collection, including its 
major pieces, now forms part of the George Washington Flowers Memorial 
Collection of the Duke University Library. Some items fiom his library are at the 
University of Georgia, and occasional single items have strayed into other libraries. 
Jones was an omnivorous collector. He collected manuscripts as well as books, 
putting together two fine sets of autograph letters of the Signers of the Declaration 
of Independence. (One set of these is now in the New York State Library at 
Albany.) He collected a similar set of manuscripts of the members of the 
Convention which established the Confederate States of America at Montgomery in 
1861 . It is now at Duke. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Wymberley Jones Do Renne were both collectors, he of 
everything Georgian, she of those things Confederate. Their interests obviously 
overlapped. His collection (recorded in a splendid three-volume catalog privately 



published)^ is now at the University of Georgia where its Confederate imprints are 
supplemented by those in the fine collection given the University a decade ago by 
Felix Hargrett, another Georgian and eminent book collector, increased by the 
assiduous purchasing of Confederate materials by W. Porter Kellam, former 
Librarian of the University, Georgia's collection vies with those of the Boston 
Athenaeum, Duke, and the Library of Congress for numerical leadership in this 
field of collecting. 

Mrs. De Renne's Confederate collection was given to the Confederate Museum in 
Richmond. Its Confederate imprints form a substantial part of the Museum's 
extensive collection of Confederate publications. The revered Douglas Southall 
Freeman wrote of them in 1908 in his "Bibliography of Some Confederate 
Publications in the Confederate Museum": "The books and pamphlets gathered by 
Mrs. Mary De Renne of Savannah, and known as the De Renne Collection, are the 
most valuable of the Library. At a time when Confederate publications were much 
more numerous and more easily acquired than at present, Mrs. De Renne, with rare 
judgement, gathered a collection of Confederate publications second to none in the 
country ."3 

The fourth of the Confederate collections formed by Savannahians is that of 
Keith M. Read, neighbor and collecting rival of the De Rennes. The Read collection 
was purchased by the Emory University Library in 1939 and established in that 
library a major collection of Confederate imprints which has fortunately been 
systematically augmented. 

The collecting of Confederate publications was a major interest of the major 
book collectors of Savannah. Book collecting is not the quiet, friendly occupation 
it might seem to the uninitiated. It spawns rivalries and can sunder friendships. 
Bibliomania is, as an extensive literature attests, a virulent disease, and usually 
incurable. Major libraries of the South and the world of scholarship have benefited 
by the energies of Savannah's collectors, but the Georgia Historical Society is 
undoubtedly the poorer for these interests of the citizens of its home city though 
they were interests of the very kind the Society seeks to engender in all Georgians. 

In comparison with the major collections of Confederate imprints, those at the 
Boston Athenaeum, Yale, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, 
the University of Virginia, the Confederate Museum, the Virginia Historical Society, 
the Virginia State Library, Duke, the University of North Carolina, Emory, the 
University of Georgia, Rice, the University of Texas, the University of Illinois, and 
the Henry E. Huntington Library, the collection of the Georgia Historical Society is 
not large. It is however, a worthwhile collection and merits interest for its group of 
otherwise uncollected items. 

A large proportion of the Confederate imprints at Hodgson Hall came to it in 
1952 when efforts of Mrs. Lilla Hawes secured for the Historical Society a set of 
the so-called "captured documents" then being distributed as duplicates by the 
Library of Congress. These official publications of the Confederate government had 
been removed from the Capitol in Richmond at the end of the Civil War and, 
stamped "Rebel Archives," had, until their transfer to the Library of Congress, 
remained in the Records Division of the War Department. The set received by the 
Historical Society was one of the last sent out of Washington and is less full in its 
holdings than sets earlier distributed. Even so, it includes approximately 345 
separate publications of various branches of the Confederate government. 

The rest of the collection is a miscellany of publications of the state of Georgia 
and of the unofficial books, pamphlets, sheet music, broadsides, and church 
publications that make up the publishing record of the Confederacy. It is 
distressingly weak where it should be strong - in the publications that originated in 

6 



Savannah; but tliere are items in the collection that deserve the envy of any private 
collector and many institutional collectors. 

The Historical Society's copy of Uniform and Dress of the Army of the 
Confederate States (Richmond: 1861), with its quaintly attractive black-and-white 
plates, is that which belonged to General A. R. Lawton, a Savannahian who was an 
outstanding Confederate administrator as Quartermaster General, later President of 
the Society 1907 - 1914. A rare naval item (the only other known copy being at the 
Library of Congress) is Horace M. Heiskell's Pay Table for the Use of Paymasters 
and Others of the United States Navy (Columbia; 1864). It and other naval pieces, 
including one presumed to be unique, came to the Society with a portion of the 
wartime papers of Charles Lucian Jones. Jones was an Assistant Paymaster in the 
Confederate Navy. He served as such with the Savannah Squadron in 1863 till he 
was transferred April 13, 1863, to serve aboard the honchd Savannah as secretary 
to the Commander in Chief of the Naval Forces Afloat in Savannah Waters. Two 
items concerning slavery and the Negro are of considerable rarity and importance, 
J.D.B. DeBow's Tlie Interest in Slavery of the Southern Non-Slaveholder 
(Charleston: 1860) and Joseph R. Wilson's Mutual Relations of Masters and Slaves 
As Taught in the Bible (Augusta; 1861). There is a copy of the Richmond 1863 
edition of South Carolinian Francis Peyre Porcher's Resources of the Southern 
Fields and forests. Medical, Economical, and Agricultural, a comprehensive study 
in the great tradition of Catesby, Bartram and Elliott. Porcher's work proved 
immediately useful in the wartime South by denominating substitutes for many 
items unobtainable because of the Federal blockade; quinine and coffee, for 
examples. 

In the bibliographies of Confederate imprints a great many items, some of 
exceptional interest, show in the record only as numbers of General Orders or titles 
too brief to indicate their importance. For example, Crandall* 685 is a broadside 
address by Gen. W. J. Hardee listed under Confederate States of America. Army of 
Tennessee and the title "To the soldiers of the Army of Tennessee!" Crandall lists 
only a copy of this at the Huntington Library. It is one of a pair of military 
publications which must be read together to realize their importance. Its 
companion piece, apparently held only by the Society '^•cneral Orders No. 214 
of the Army of Tennessee, dated at Dalton, Decembci , i863. This broadside is 
the farewell to his troops of Gen. Braxton Bragg who had received orders to 
transfer command of the Army of Tennessee to jeneral Hardee. 

Bragg wrote in part: 

The announcement of this separation is made with unfeigned 
regret. The associations of more than two years which bind together a 
Commander and his trusted troops, cannot be severed without deep 
emotion. A common cause and dangers shared on the many hard-fought 
fields from Pensacola to Chickamauga have cemented bonds which time 
even can never impair. 

The circumstances which render this step proper will be appreciated, 
however, by every good soldier and true patriot, and the last appeal the 
General has to make to the gallant army which has so long and so nobly 
sustained him, is to give his successor that cordial and generous support 
so essential to the success of our arms. In that successor you have a 
veteran whose brilliant reputation you have aided to achieve. He cannot 
fail, if properly sustained, to fill the measure of our country's 
expectations. 5 



The new commander, wlio a year later would be defending Savannah, four 
hundred miles to the southeast, greeted his troops with the optimism expected on 
such an occasion. Hardee declared: 

I desire to say, in assuming command, that there is no cause for 
discouragement. The overwhelming numbers of the enemy forced us 
back from Missionary Ridge, but the army is still intact and in good 
heart. Our losses were small and will be rapidly replaced. The country is 
looking to you with painful interest. I feel that it can rely upon you. 
Only the weak and timid need to be cheered by constant success. The 
veterans of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro and Chickamauga require 
no such stimulus to sustain their courage and resolution. Let the past 
take care of itself, we can and must secure the future. 6 

Another unique item from Tennessee is a broadside of 1862 issued by Col. M.A. 
Stovall at Greeneville. It warns against the ill treatment of East Tennesseeans 
formerly Unionists who have taken the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States. 

Except for three titles, one looks in vain for Confederate belles-lettres at 
Hodgson Hall; but the three titles there are of high quality. One is Nathaniel 
Beverley Tucker's 77/*? Partisan />ea<ier (Richmond: 1862), a novel prophetic of civil 
war which had first been published in Washington in 1836 (surreptitiously and with 
the fictitious imprint date of 1856). When the Civil War did come about Tucker's 
book was republished in New York as well as in Richmond. There is a copy (one of 
only two known) of Joseph Hodgson's The Confederate Vivandiere (Montgomery: 
1862). And of particular importance as a Georgia book, there is a fine, untrimmed 
copy of Richard Malcolm Johnston's Georgia Sketches ([Augusta:] 1864), an early 
rendition of his Dukesborough Tales. 

The representation of the popular works reprinted from English and European 
publications is comparatively strong: copies oi Aurora Floyd (Richmond: 1863), 
Darrell Markham; or, The Captain of the Vulture (Richmond: 1863), and Lady 
Audley 's Secret! (Mobile: 1864) by the prolific and enormously popular Mrs. Mary 
Elizabeth Braddon Maxwell; Wilkie Collins' M; A^ame (Richmond: 1863), Charles 
Dickens' Great Expectations (Mobile: 1863), The Romance of a Poor Young Man 
(Richmond: 1863) by Octave Feuillet, four of the five parts of Victor Hugo's Les 
Miserables (Richmond: 1863-64), one of two volumes of Louisa Muhlbach's (i.e. 
Klara Mundt's) Henr}' VIII and His Court; or, Catharine Parr f Mobile: 1865) and a 
complete set of her four-volume Joseph II and His Court (Mobile: 1864), Wilham 
Makepeace Thackeray's The Adventures of Philip on His Way Through the World 
(Columbia: 1864), and Mrs. Ellen Price Wood's East Lynne. (Richmond: 1864). 

There are more than sixty examples of Confederate sheet music, many of them 
in editions by John C. Schreiner & Son, publishers with offices in Macon and 
Savannah. The A. E. Blackmar company of New Orleans (later of Augusta and New 
Orleans) is also well represented. There are copies of "Lorena," the song that named 
a generation of Southern girls, of "When This Cruel War Is Over," Hermann L. 
Schreiner's "Do They Think of Me at Home?" dedicated to Mrs. Norah C. Sneed of 
Savannah, and of the familiar tribute to the mulatto "Yellow Rose of Texas." But 
there is no copy in this collection of the most Georgian of all songs, "Somebody's 
Darling," words by Miss Marie La Coste of Savannah, music by John Hill Hewitt 
(then living in Augusta), dedicated to Miss Mary Davis of Augusta, printed by J.F. 
Weeks in Macon on paper manufactured at Athens, and published jointly by John 
C. Schreiner & Son of Macon and Savannah and Schreiner & Hewitt of 

8 



Augusta.^ Nor is there a copy of "My Wife and Child" (Richmond and Columbia: 
1863). Falsely attributed to "Stonewall" Jackson, the words of this song were 
written by Henry Rootes Jackson, President of the Society 1874-1899. Quondam 
Savannahian John Hill Hewitt is represented by his "Freedom's Muster-Drum", "I 
Will Meet Thee", "Oh! Come to Me, Love, in a Beautiful Dream", "Rock Me to 
Sleep, Mother" (three editions), "The Stonewall Quickstep", "When Upon the 
Field of Glory", and "You Are Going to the Wars, Willie Boy!" But Hewitt was the 
most prolific of Confederate composers. Even this representation is smaller than 
should be available in Savannah. (Hewitt's papers, along with a broader selection of 
his published sheet music, are in the Emory University Library.) At Hodgson Hall 
are copies of songs honoring Generals Beauregard, Jackson, and Lee, but no"Genl 
Longstreet's Grand March" nor - honoring Savannah's own Gen. Hugh W. Mercer 
- "Gen. Mercer's Grand March!" 

So is it down the line, through the long list of Confederate publications. The 
Historical Society can be justly proud of the collection of Confederate imprints it 
has, but is must eternally regret those that got away. Fortunately, two major 
collections of these materials are in the state, at Emory and at the University of 
Georgia. 

The Society can indeed treasure the Confederate publications it owns, especially 
that small bank of items not recorded elsewhere. It is a paradox that Confederate 
imprints seem to be less rare as the record of them grows. Dr. Freeman's 1908 
selective list was the first general bibliography of Confederate imprints. Nearly a 
decade later it was foDowed by the much more extensive Confederate Literature 
(Boston: 1917), a record of the collection of the Boston Athenaeum by Charles N. 
Baxter and James M. Dearborn. ^ This volume was supplemented in a 1929 article 
in The Papers of the BibUographical Society of America by Willard O. Waters of the 
staff of the Henry E. Huntington Library. ^ Waters listed 412 items at the 
Huntington which had not been recorded in "Baxter and Dearborn," to use the 
book dealers' reference. Shortly after World War II the Athenaeum's collection of 
Confederate imprints was virtually doubled by the addition to it of those collected 
by Judge Raymond S. Wilkins. Walter Muir Whitehill, the amiable literary and 
historiographical impresario who then presided over the Athenaeum as its Director 
and Librarian, decided that Confederate Literature neeH • I updating, and in away 
that would reflect the total output of Confederate j acations, not just the 
holdings, however extensive, of the Athenaeum itself. Ihe late Marjorie Lyle 
Crandall, with the editorial collaboration of Richard Harwell, and the participatory 
collaboration of scores of libraries put together for pubhcation in 1955 Confederate 
Imprints. Exclusive of listings for newspapers and periodicals, its two volumes 
record 5121 items. 

Bibliographies beget bibliographies. Recording the rare calls out more rare to be 
recorded. Confederate Imprints was followed a scart two years later with Harwell's 
More Confederate Imprints}^ this supplement, itself in two volumes, adding 1773 
items to the list of Confederate publications. The record had grown from the few 
score described by Freeman to nearly seven thousand. 

New discoveries of Confederate imprints since 1957 only emphasize that the 
bibliographer's is an imperfect art. In 1964 Harwell listed 102 new items that had 
come to the University of Georgia Libraries (chiefly in the gift of Felix 
Hargrett).^^ Winston Broadfoot added a record of 317 previously unrecorded 
items at the Duke University Library in 1966.^2 The collections in other libraries 
were described and newly discovered publications noted. All the while the 
established collections continued to grow — and continue to grow. Harwell and 



Peter Haack, Assistant Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum, are once more engaged 
in revising and amphfying the record. The paradox is that there is so much to 
record that Confederate imprints miglit seem to have lost their rarity. Confederate 
imprints as a group are less rare; but, as a group, the hst of Confederate imprints is a 
list of many, many more rarities. 

Such rarest of the rare - items known in only one copy each - are items at 
Hodgson Hall which can now be added to the record. Many of these are 
comparatively trivial military pieces, but it is sometimes a seemingly trivial item 
that is the missing link of a historian's search. The slight Table of Hospital 
Knapsack and Haversack for Field Services (n.p., n.d.j lists information not found 
elsewhere. General Magruder's unnumbered general order of 4 July 1862 adds to 
knowledge of him and of the battles before Richmond and also records his farewell 
to his troops in Virginia. Three general orders, one special order, and three circulars 
add to the detailed record of the defense of Georgia. Four of these items were 
promulgated for Gen. Hugh W. Mercer by Capt. and A. A. G. George A. Mercer, 
President of the Society 1900-1907. 

Among unofficial publications are several times of particular interest: a long 
poem "Greek Fire; or. The Siege of Charleston" by Eustanzia, the primitive verse of 
James Hellier noted as "Songs Dedicated to the 26th La., Regiment," and Carrie Bell 
Sinclair's "The Soldier's Suit of Grey." Miss Sinclair's poem was also published with 
music by E. Clark Ilsley by Blackmar & Bro. in Augusta (copies at Emory and 
Georgia but not at the Historical Society). The Society does hold James Pierpont's 
musical setting of her Strike for the South (Macon: John C. Schreiner & Son, c. 
1863). 

Notable among the general broadsides is an elaborately reasoned proposal 
Annexation of the North West ([Savannah, 186-?]) calling for the admission the 
the Confederacy of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. There are two previously 
unrecorded pieces of sheet music, a different edition of "Some One To Love." And 
tucked away in this conglomeration is a previously unrecorded publication by the 
Rev. Francis R. Goulding, author of The Young Marooners. It is not another boys' 
book, however, but a Hospital Tract published in Macon by the Georgia Baptist 
Bible and Colportage Society. 



10 



CONFEDERATE IMPRINTS IN THE LIBRARY OF THE 
GEORGIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY NOT RECORDED IN 

CONFEDERA TE IMPRINTS OR MORE CONFEDERA TE IMPRINTS 

Official entries 

Confederate States of America. Army. Army of Northern Virginia 

. . . General orders, No. [ ] Major General Magruder Commanding the Centre 
returns his thanks to the gallant officers and men, who fought under his orders and 
gained a victory on the 1st inst., overcoming by their impetuosity, and tenacity, the 
great obstacles of the ground, the terrific fire of the enemy's Field Artillery, and 
Gun Boats, and the musketry of a superior force strongly posted ... By command 
of Major General Magruder. A.G. Dickinson, A.A. General, [n.p., 1862.] 
Broadside, 20 x 12.5 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters Crew's Farm, Assistant Adjutant General's Office, July 
4th, 1862. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Army of Tennessee 

General orders. Headquarters. Army of Tennessee, [n.p., 1863.] v.p. 

Nos. 1-214; January - December 2, 1863. 

Crandall 672 revised. 

The Georgia Historical Society holds General order no. 214, December 2, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of East Tennessee 

. . . The commanding officer at Greeneville regrets to learn that certain men 
pretending to be authorized officers of the government are arresting and otherwise 
ill treating some of the peaceful citizens of SulUvan county, who have heretofore 
been Unionists, but have lately voluntarily come forward and taken the oath of 
allegiance to the Confederate States of America and the State of 
Tennessee . . . [Greeneville, Tenn., 1962] 
Broadside, 32 x 14,5 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Greeneville, Tenn., Jan. 16th, 1862. 
Signed: M.A. Stovall, Col. Commanding. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of South CaroUna, Georgia and 
Florida 
Circular . . . [printing undated letter from S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector 
General, to General Beauregard emphasizing the need for recruiting new soldiers; 
received at Head Quarters [of the] Department [of] South Carolina, Georgia and 
Florida, Charleston, January 11th, 1863. Charleston, 1863.] 
Broadside, 25.5 x 20.5 cm. 

Note at end of text of Cooper's letter refers it to the Commanding General of 
the District of Georgia. 

Signed: By command of General Beauregard. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of South Carolina, Georgia and 
Florida 

Circular . . . [calling attention to parts of General Orders, No. 126, concerning 
requirements in connection with requisitions for ordnance. Charleston, 1863.] 

Broadside, 19 x 13.5 cm. 

11 



Dated: Head Quarters, Department ofS.C, Ga. & Fla., Charleston, S.C., January 
15, 1863. 

Signed: By command of General Beauregard, J no. M. Otey, Assistant Adjutant 
General. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of South Carolina, Georgia and 
Florida 

Circular . . . [concerning exaggerated reports of enemy forces and giving a table 
of the numbers of men to be found in various types of units of the United States 
army.) By command of General Beauregard. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. 
[Charleston, 1863.] 

Broadside, 19.5 x 13 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, 
Charleston, S.C, January 18th, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of South Carolina, Georgia and 
Florida 

Circular . . . [concerning promptness in filling requisitions made on several staff 
departments.] By command of General Beauregard. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff 
[Charleston, 1864.] 

Broadside, 18 x 12.5 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 
Charleston, S.C, January 28, 1864. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Department of South Carolina, Georgia and 
Florida 

Circular . . . (correcting an erroneous impression that rifled projectiles have 
greater range and accuracy when fired from smoothbore muskets than round bullets 
and ordering a stop to the requisitioning of them for such use.] By command of 
General Beauregard. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. [Charleston, 1864.] 

Broadside, 19 x 13 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, 
Charleston, S.C, February 10, 1864. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Georgia Reserve and Military District of 
Georgia 

. . . General orders. No. 30. I. The following military organizations, raised under 
the authority of Governor Brown, and afterwards received into the Confederate 
service by General J.B. Hood, to wit: the regiment commanded by Col. Findley, the 
battalion commanded by Majors Beall, Murkinson, Graham, McCallum and 
Ledford, and the battalion lately commanded by Lt. Col. Glenn, of Pickens county, 
(whose commission was revoked because he was reported to Gov. Brown as a 
deserter,) under the person who may have been elected, to command it, will be 
maintained for sixty days from date in discharge of such duties as they may be 
called upon to perform . . . [Macon, Ga., 1864.] 

Broadside, 27 x 16 cm. 

At head of title: Headquarters Georgia Reserve and Military District of Georgia, 
Macon, Ga., December 7th, 1864. 

At end is concurring order of Gov. Joseph /•'. Brown dated: Fxecutive 
Department, Macon, Ga., Dec. 7th, 1864. 

12 



Confederate States of America. Army. Military District of Georgia 

. . . Circular. Ordnance Tegulations require that all empty powder barrels and 

kegs, ammunition, shell, and packing boxes, shall be regularly taken up on the 

Property Returns, and accounted for as other ordnance stores . . . [Signed: A.T. 

Cunningham, 1st Lt.] Art'y and Ord. [Savannah, 1862.] 
Broadside, 21 x 13.5 cm. 

Dated: March 18th, 1862; ''March "corrected to "Oct. "in MS. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Military District of Georgia 

.... [Circular reprinting Circular of Surgeon General's Office, Richmond, Va., 
Sept. 10, 1862, which reprinted General Orders, No. 32 of that office dated April 
30, 1862, and General Orders, No. 61 of that office dated August 23, 1862, 
concerning the transportation of hospital supplies. [Signed:] Brig. Genl Mercer, 
George A. Mercer, Capt. and A.A.G. [Savannah, 1863.] 
Broadside, 22.5 x 19 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, District of Georgia, Savannah, February 27, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Military District of Georgia 

Circular . . . The Brigadier General Commanding regrets to say, that some few of 
the men of this and other commands have deserted their posts, and are now basely 
skulking in the woods and swamps. Kind measures have failed to secure the return 
of these criminals. Other means must be resorted to ... By command of Brigadier 
General Mercer. Geo. A. Mercer, Capt., and A.A.G. [Savannah, 1863.] 
Broadside, 20.5 x 14 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters [ , ] Mil. Dis't Geo., Savannah, September 16th, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. Army. MiUtary District of Georgia 

General orders, No. 51. I. In order to prevent unnecessary deterioration and 
waste of ammunition, and the better to preserve small arms, the following 
regulations will be strictly compUed with . . . [Signed:] By command of Brigadier 
General H.W. Mercer. George A. Mercer, Captain and Asst. Adjt. Genl. [Savannah, 
1863.] 

Broadside, 27 x 21.5 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters Mil. Dist. Ga., Savannah, December 8th, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Military District of Georgia 

General orders. No. 8 . . . [calling the attention of commanding officers to the 

depredations committed by soldiers upon private property in Georgia and South 

Carolina. Signed:] By orders of Major General Gilmer. J.H. Alexander, Maj. & 

A.A.G. [Savannah, 1864.] 
Broadside, 28 x 21.5 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Savannah, March 21st, 1864. 

Confederate States of America. Army. Military District of Georgia 

. . . Special orders, No. 253 . . . [concerning enlisted men detailed from Head 

Quarters.] By Command of Brig. Gen. Mercer, W.W. Gordon, Captain and A.A.G. 

[Savannah, 1863.] 

Broadside, 20.5 x 16 cm. 

A t head of title <^xtract^ 

Dated: Head Quarters/ , J Mil. Dis't Geo., Savannah, 18th September, 1863. 

13 



Confederate States of America. Congress 

... An act to relieve the army of disqualified, disabled, and incompetent 
officers. [Richmond, 1862.] 3 p. 20.5 cm. 

Caption title. 

At head of title: No. 26 

Approved Oetober 13, 1862. 

Confederate States of America. Conscript Department. Department of Georgia. 
Camp of Instruction, no. 2 

. . . General orders, no. 21 . I. Conscripts detailed on government work cannot be 
transferred by any government officer or contractor to the establishment of 
another; but, in all cases, in leaving their employer they must report to the enrolling 
officer or the commandant of the Camp of Instruction, who, with the consent of 
their employer, may detail them anew under another government officer or 
contractor on his making the necessary application . . . [Signed:] By order of 
Major John F. Andrews, A.A.G., Commanding Camp of Instruction, No. 2, Alfred 
Prescott, Adjutant. [Decatur, Ga.,? 1863.] 

Broadside, 24 x 14 cm. 

Dated: Head Quarters, Camp of Instruction, no. 2, Camp Randolph, Decatur, 
Ga.,July 10th, 1863. 

Followed by General orders, no. 22, similarly signed and dated. 

Confederate States of America. Navy Department 

Regulations governing the accounting officers in settling Navy accounts in this 
office. [Richmond, 1864.] [2] p. 23.5 cm. 

Caption title. 

Signed: J. W. Robertson, Acting Auditor. 

Dated: First Auditor's Office, January 1, 1864. 

Confederate States of America. Surgeon-GeneraPs Office 

[Circular letter] ... I herein inclose invoice of Medical stores turned over to the 
Quarter Master this day for transportation . . . [Savannah, 1862.] 

Broadside, 23 x 15 cm. 

Dated: Confederate States of America, Medical Purveyor's Office, Savannah, 
I November 181 186/2/. 

"To Surgeon /Cap. EC. Anderson/ . " 

Signed: /R Q L / ^/ Stacy, As Surg & Field Purveyor/. 

Confederate States of America. Surgeon-General's Office. 

Table of hospital knapsack and haversack for field service . . . [n.p., n.d.] [4] p. 
16 cm. 

Caption title. 

P. /2/ : Tabic for nwss chest; p. /3/ : Table for regimental field chest; p. /4/: 
Table for store chest. 

Confederate States of America. Treasury Department 

Claims for payments due to deceased soldiers . . . (Richmond, 1861.] 
Broadside, 22 x 14 cm. 

Dated: Treasury Department, Second Auditor's Office, December 30, 1861. 
Signed by W.S. Taylor, Auditor; approved by Lewis Cruger, Comptroller. 

14 



Text of regulations printed within decorative border. 

Confederate States of America. War Department 

Circular . . . The practice of issuing, on the eve of an expected engagement 
twenty rounds of ammunition to infantry, over and above the capacity of the 
cartridge-boxes, will be discontinued, except on the special order of a General 
commanding an army or department . . . [Richmond, 1863.] 

Broadside, 19.5 x 13 cm. 

Dated: Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, Richmond, June 22, 1863. 
Signed: H.L. Clay, Lieut. -Col. and A. A. G. 

Confederate States of America. War Department 
Circular . . . [Richmond, 1863.] [1] p. 20 cm. 

Dated: Quartermaster General's Office . . . Sept. 9, 1863. 

Confederate States of America. War Department 

General orders from Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, Confederate States 
Army, in 1862; prepared from the files of Headquarters, Department of S.C.,Ga., 
and Fla. With a full index. Charleston: Evans & Cogswell, No. 3 Broad Street, 1863. 
xxvi p. 20 cm. 

Index only. 

Georgia. Adjutant General 

General orders, no. 5 . . . The following is the organization of the Regular Army 
of Georgia, under the provisions of an ordinance of the Convention of the State of 
Georgia, passed January 25th, 1861, and the order of precedence and relative rank 
of the officers in their respective grades . . . [Milledgeville, 1861] 6 p. 22.5 cm. 

Dated: Executive department. Adjutant general's office, Milledgeville, Ga., 
February 20, 1861. 

Georgia. Adjutant General 

<^ircular^. . . An appointment of the twelve ne / regiments to be raised under 
the late requisition by the President upon the governor of this state has been made, 
and approved by the commander-in-chief, with as much equality and justice as 
possible among the different counties of this state . . . [Signed:] Henry C. Wayne, 
Adj't. & Ins. General. [Milledgeville, 1862.] 

Broadside, 27.5 x 21 .5 cm. 

Dated: State of Georgia. Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, Milledgeville, 
Ga., February 17, 1862. 

Georgia. General Assembly 

Acts and resolutions passed at the called session held in March and April, 
1863 .. . [Milledgeville. Boughton, Nisbet & Barnes, State Printers. 1863.] [49] - 
[79], [1] p. 24.5 cm. 

Caption title. 

Georgia. General Assembly. House. Committee on State Endorsement of the 
Confederate Debt. 
Report of the majority of the Committee on state endorsement of the 



15 



Confederate debt. Milledgeville, Ga., Bou^ton, Nisbet & Barnes, State Printers, 
1863. 7 p. 23 cm. 

Georgia. Quartermaster's Department. 

. . .Gentlemen: I am directed by his excellency the Governor, to say to you 
that, in the distribution of the funds and yarns provided by the legislature for the 
destitute famihes of soldiers, the families of State Troops, if destitute, are entitled 
to an equal participation with others . . . [Signed.] J.A.R. Hanks, Assistant 
Quartermaster, State of Georgia. [Atlanta, 1863.] 

Broadside, 20 x 14.5 cm. 

At head of title: State of Georgia, Assistant Quartermaster's Office, Atlanta [2d 
Nov] J 863. 



16 



3fifad.^uarter$ Camp pf Mn$txuc\m, ^o. 2, ^ 

DECATUR, GA., July loth, ISCyA. J 

I. CoHicripU detailed on Government work cannot l)e trans- 
forriMi bj ftnf Government Officer or Contractor to the eetahligh- 
inciit of anoUMT ; but, In all ca«e«, on leaving their employor 
they must rtoort to the Enrolling Officer or the CommanUant of 
the Camp of iMtruction, who, vnththe consent of their emuJof^er, 
may detail ibem anew under another Government Otncer or 
Contractor on hi* mtkinff the neceaaarj applic'ion. 

II. Coa^cripts detailed on Government work will not bo trans- 
ferred to Uailroads, nor any other work or service except that of 
the Government, unless by B|)ecial order from the War Depart- 
ment. 

III. Conecripta leaving the employment of the Government 
Officer or Contractor under whom they are detailed, vvithout his 
consent, or going into the employment of another ulthout re- 
Dorting to the Enrolling Officer or Commandant of the Camp of 
Instruction, are guilty of desertion, and, in accordance with 
orders from the fcJecreUry of War, will be arrested and sent to 
Cfttnn of Instruction. 

I V. Government Officers or Contractors who suffer conscript* 
detailed under them to leave their employment without report- 
ing them to the Enrolling Officer or Commandant of the Camp 
of Instniction, are not only gMiltr of a violation of their obliga- 
tions, (if a Contractor, his oath,) but, under orders from the War 
Department, thev forfeit all right to any other details. 

V. Enrolling Officers of the 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th and 10th Con- 
gressional Districts will be governed by the instructions contain- 
ed in the above paragraphs. 

By order of M^jor JOHlf P. ANDfiBWS, 

A. A, O., Coimnatiding Camp of Instrnctho), Xo. i. 
Alfkli) Peescott, Adjutant. 



fiead-djuarttrji Camp of |n$tturtion, ila. 2, ] 

DKCATrU, GA., July l"th, lb03. J 

Conscrij)t6 who have been mustered into the service at tliis 
Camp of instruction and afterwards detailed out of the Camj) on 
Government work, cannot receive a renewal or extension of their 
details from any other source than from the Comiiiandaut oi the 
('amp ; and at the expiration of their details, if no application 
be made for their renewal bv their employers, they will be order- 
ed back to Camp, and no lurthor detail granted to sue h employ- 
ers. By order of 

Major JOHN F. ANDREWS, 
A. A. G.y Coniiva)yiiny Camp flii^ti vAion, Ao. 2. 

AlFKED Piti;oOOTT, -(4t//'K''«l/. 17 



Eighth Annual Report 



^arannali, StlVann iind #ulf 




\j^ ♦ If V 



ail lioad d^ompang. 



M n y , 1 8 6 ^3 



18 



Unofficial entries 



Augusta and Savannah Rail Road 

Eleventh report of the president and directors of the Augusta and Savannah Rail 
Road. To the Stockholders. For the year 1861. Savannah. Purse's print., 1862. 15 
p. 22.5 cm. 

Cover-title: Eleventh annual report of the Augusta and Savannah R. Road. 1861. 
Harwell 1 159 revised. 

Central Rail Road and Banking Company of Georgia 

Local rates of transportation on Central Rail Road and branches, Macon and 
Western R.R., South Western R.R. and branches, and Muscogee Rail Road. To go 
into operation June 15th, 1863. Savannah: E.J. Purse, Printer, 1863. 24 p., 7 fold, 
tables. 

Cover title. 

Signed at end of text: Geo. W. Adams, General Superintendent C.R.R. 

Folding tables measure 24 cm high. 

Confederate , pseud. 

Annexation of the North West . . . [Savannah, 186-] 
Broadside, 41 x 39.5 cm. 

Proposes the annexation of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois to the Confederate States. 

Goulding, Francis Robert 

Hospital tract, by Rev. F.R. Goulding . . . [Macon, Ga., Ga. Bap. Bible & Col. 
Society, n.d.] 4 p. 15.5 cm. 

Caption title. 
No. 20. - p. 4 
Burke, Boy kin & Co., Printers, - p. 4 

Greek Fire: or. The siege of Charleston, by Eustanzia . . . \n.p., 1863?] 
Broadside, 48 x 15.5 cm. 

Poem printed in nvo columns. 

Dated at end: New Orleans. October, 1863. 

Hellier, James 

Song. Dedicated the 26th La., regiment, by James Hellier . . ; [n.p., 1862?] 
Broadside, 30.5 x 12 cm. 

Verse. 

'i know not why I love thee!" . . . [Savannah? n.d.\ 
Broadside, 17.5 x 11.5 cm. 

Verse. 

Katie Payne, by Cousin Nourma . . . [Macon, 1864] 
Broadside, 23.10cm. 

Dated at end: Macon, Ga. 7.27. '64. 
Verse. 

19 



O give me a home by the sea; words and music by E.A. Hosmer. New Orleans, A. 
E. Blackmar& Bro., [etc., etc. 186-] 

5 p. (The exotics; flowers of song transplanted to Southern soil.) 

Title from caption. 
Catalogue on verso of p. 5. 
Engraver: Wehrmann. 
Sheet music. 

Oglethorpe Medical College, Savannah, Georgia 

Annual circular of Oglethorpe Medical College, Savannah, Georgia. With a 
catalogue of the graduates from thi- opening of the institution, and announcement 
of lectures, session of 1861-62. Savannah: John M. Cooper & Company. 1861. 10 
p. 22 cm. 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

The Book of Common Prayer, and administration of the sacraments; and other 
rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Confederate States of America: together with the Psalter, or Psalms 
of David. Richmond, Virginia: J.W. Randolph. M. DCCC. LXIII. [376] , 187, [1] p. 
12.5 cm. 

Imprint: London: - Printed by G.E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode. 

This includes (187 pp.): Selections from the Psalms of David in metre; with 
hymns suited to the feasts and fasts of the church, and other occasions of public 
worship. Richmond Virginia: J.W. Randolph. M.DCCC.LXIII. 

Protestant Episcopal Church. Diocese of Georgia. 

To the clergy of the diocese of Georgia . . . [Savannah, 1861.] 
Broadside, 18.5 x 14.5 cm. 

Sets Sunday, July 28, 1861 , as a day of thanksgiving and praise. 
Dated and signed: Given under my hand this July 24th, 1861. Stephen Elliott, 
Bishop of the Diocese of Georgia. 

Confederate Imprints in the University of Georgia Libraries, item 95. 

Savannah, Albany and Gulf Railroad Company 

Seventh annual report of the president and directors of the Savannah, Albany 
and Gulf Railroad Company, to the stockholders. Savannah: E.J. Purse, Printer. 
1861.21 p. Fold, table. 22 cm. 

Crandall 3000 revised. 

Savannah, Albany and Gulf Railroad Company 

Eighth annual report of the president and directors of the Savannah, Albany and 
Gulf Rail Road Company, to the stockholders. May, 1862. Savannah, Georgia: Geo. 
N. Nichols, Printer. 1862. 25 p. 22.5 cm. 

Savannah Artillery 

Rules for the government of the Savannah Artillery, adopted Febuary [sic\, 
1861. Savannah: Geo. N. Nichols, Printer. 1861. 35 p. 17 cm. 

Cover-title: Savannah Artillery 1861, encircles seal oj Georgia. 



20 



[Sawyer, Charles Carroll] 

When this cruel war is over. [Savannah? n.d.] 
Broadside, 19.5 x 10.5 cm. 

Verse, without music. 

. . . Secession quick step, by Herman L. Schreiner. Macon, Ga.: John C. 
Schreiner & Sons, n.d. 6 p. 

Flag with thirteen stars and rattlesnake on cover; overprinted on flag: The 
South, the whole South, and nothing but the South. Noli me tangere! 
Sheet music. 

Possibly printed before the secession of Georgia. 
Confederate Imprints in the University of Georgia Libraries, //em 87. 

Sinclair, Carrie Bell 

. . . The soldier's suit of grey. Dedicated to the soldiers of the South.<^y Carrie 
Bell Sinclair^. . . [Savannah, 186-] 

Broadside, 33.5 x 13 cm. 

At head of title: <^opy right secured^ 

Verse; without music. 

MS note by Miss Sinclair: "Air - Bonnie Blue Flag. " 

Some one to love, ballad. Words by James Simmonds, music by J.R. Thomas. 
Macon and Savannah, J.C. Schreiner & Son; Augusta, Ga., Schreiner & Hewitt, n.d. 
4 p. 

Sheet music. 

The song of all songs, an original conglomeration of titles. Air — "The captain 
with his whiskers." [Savannah? n.d.\ 
Broadside, 22 x 12.5 cm. 

Verse. 

Southern land of Canan [sic] . "Air — Happy land of C a." . . . [New Orleans] 
John Hopkins, printer [1861?] 
Broadside, 28 x 10 cm. 

Verse. 

To our Southern brothers . . . [Savannah? n.d.] 
Broadside, 22 x 15 cm. 

Verse. 



21 



.\c\\\s/)upcr.s and Periodicals 



The Brunswick Advocate. Brunswick. Ga., 1861. 
1861: Feb. 8. 

The Charleston Daily Courier. Charleston, S.C., 1861-63. 

1861: Nov. 27 

1862: Feb. 17. Mar. 7. 8, 13. Apr. 6, July 15, 16, 21. 25. 28. Aug. 13, Sept. 5,8. 
12, 15, 18. 22. 25, 26, Oct. 1,4,9, 15-18, 20, 28, 30, Nov. 3.5,7.8. 15, 
18.21,22,24. 27, 29. Dec. 1, 10, 15, 17, 19,27,29-31. 

1863: Jan. I. 5, 8. 13, 15, 19, 20, 24, 27, 29-31, Feb. 3. 5, 6,7, 12. 23-27, Apr. 
16. May 14. 

The Charleston Mercury. Charleston, S.C., 1861-63. 

1861: Nov. 27. 

1862: Feb. 18, 19. Mar. 8. 20-22. 27. Apr. 17, 18, May 1,22, 24, June 5. July 24, 

Sept. 16, Oct. 11, Nov. 5.8, 11, 25, Dec. 8. 17,27. 
1863: Jan. 6, Feb. 2. May 9, June 13, 26, July 4, 6. 9. Aug. 30. Nov. 13. 

The Chattanooga Daily Rebel. 
See The Daily Rebel. 

Constitutionalist. Augusta, Ga., 1861 . 
1861: Mar. 22-23-24 extra. 
See also Daily Constitutionalist. 

The Countryman. Turnwold, Ga., 1862. 

1862: Sept. 29, Oct. 6, Nov. 10, 17, 24, Dec. 1,8, 15. 

The Daily Chattanooga Rebel. 
See The Daily Rebel. 

Daily Commonwealth. Atlanta, Ga., 1863. 
1863: May 8. 

Daily Constitutionalist. Augusta, Ga., 1862-64. 

1862: Feb. 6, 13, Apr. 27, Oct. 6. 

1864: May 6. 

See also Constitutionalist. 

Daily Dispatch. Richmond, Va., 1861-62. 

1861: July 23. Aug. 17. 

1862: Feb. 1.6-8. 10. 1 1. 14. 15. 18-22. 26. Mar. 3.4,6,8, 10, 11. 15, 18, 19, 22, 

24-27.30. May 1,3. 5-8. 10, 12, 13. 15, 16. 19. 21 . 23. 24. 26, 27, 30, June 

2, 3, Dec. 15, 17.30,31 

Daily Morning News. Savannah. Ga., 1 861-64. 

1861: Jan. 21. 24. Mar. 22. Apr. 10. 25. May I, 14. June 17. 25. 27, July 12. 13. 
23. Aug. 26. Sept. *>. Oct. 25. Nov. 2. 22. 

22 



1S62: Jan. 6, 13. 28, 30, Feb. 17, 22, Mar. II, 12, 19-21, Apr. 1 . 4. .S, «. 1 2. 14, 

18, 21-26, 29, May 3,6, 10, 14, 19-21 , 26, 27, 29-31 , June 1 l,July 16. 17, 

19, 23, 30, Aug. 14, 18-21, 26, 28, Sept. 6, 8-13, 15-18,20, 22.25-27,29, 
30, Oct. 1-4, 6-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-31, Nov. 1,3-8,10-15,17-20,24,26-29, 
Dec. 1,3-6,8-12, 15-17,20,22.23,25,27.29,30. 

1863: Jan. 6, 13-15, 19-21, 24, Feb. 4-6, 19, 23, 25, Mar. 12, 18, 19. 24, 31, Apr. 

1, 2. 8-1 1, 13-17. 22, 24, May 12-14, 19-21, 25, 27. 28. June 6, 27-29, July 

1,7.8. 23-25, 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 3, 19. 
1864: Apr. 1 1 , 24, May 12. 
See also Savannah Weekly Morning News. 

The Daily Rebel. [Marietta, Ga.? 1864] 

1864: [May 10] (undated extra) 

This is an issue of the Daily Rebel after it tied from Chattanooga. 

The Daily Richmond Enquirer. Richmond, Va., 1862. 
1862: Dec. 17. 
See also Richmond Enquirer (semi-weekly). 

Daily Richmond Examiner. Richmond, Va., 1862-64. 

1862: Mar. 3, May 13, 14, 28, July 22-26, Aug. 26, Sept. 12, 18, 19, 22, 23, 26, 

30, Oct. 1-4,7-9, 15-17,24, 30, 31, Nov. 19, 20, 22, 24-28. Dec. 4-6, 11-13, 

16. 17,20, 22,24,25,27,31. 
1863: Jan. 1 . 2, 8, 9. 13, 15, 16, 21-24, 26, 27, 30, 31, Feb. 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, Apr. 

29, Dec. 10. 
1864: Aug. 19, 26, Sept. 29, Oct. 6, Dec. 22. 

Daily Savannah Republican. 
See Savannah Republican. 

The North Carolina Journal of Education. Greensborough, 1862. 
1862: Sept. (v. 5. no. 9) 

Richmond Enquirer (semi-weekly). Richmond, Va., 1863. 

1863: Jan. 16. Feb. 6. 

See also The Daily Richmond Enquirer. 

Richmond Examiner. 

See Daily Richmond Examiner. 

Richmond Whig and Public Advertiser (semi-weekly). Richmond. Va.. 1863. 

1863: Jan. 2, 6, 23, 27, 30, Feb. 3, 6, 10, 13, 17, 20, Mar. 10, Apr. 21. 24, 28, 

May 1, 8. 12, 15, 29, June 2,5,9, 12, 16, 19. 23, 30, July 3,7, 10. 14.21. 

24. Aug. 4, 7, 1 1 , 14, 25, 28, Oct. 20, 23, 27, 30, Nov. 6. 27. 

Savannah Journal of Medicine. Savannah. Ga., 1861. 
1861: Jan., Mar., May-Oct. (v. 3, nos. 5, 6; v. 4, nos. 1-6) 

The Savannah Republican. Savannah, Ga.. 1861-64. 



23 



1861: Jan. 20-25, Apr. 25, May 4, 6-11. 13, 15-18, 20. 23, 25, 28, June 5, 6, 8, 
18, 20-22, 24-26, July 1, 8-13, 15, 17, 18, Aug. 1,3,6-9, 15-17, 19-21,29, 
31, Sept, 2-4, 9, 13, 14, 16-18, 28, Oct. 9, 12, 15, 16, 19, 22-24, 28, 30, 
31, Nov. 1,4-6, 8, 11-13, 27. 

1862: Jan. 1, 3, 6, 10, 15-18, 23, 25, 27, 28,30, Feb. 1,6-8, 10, 19, 20, 26, Mar. 
3, 4, 6, 10-15, 18-22, 24-28, Apr. 14, 8, 12, 14-16, 18. 19, 21-25, 28-30. 
May 1, 2, 5-7, 10, 12, 15, 17, 21-24, 27-31, June 2,3,5-7,9-13, 17,21,23, 
26-28, 30, July 2-4, 7, 11, 12, 15-19, 21, 22, 24-26, 28-30, Aug. 4, 5, 7, 9, 
11, 13-15, 18-23, 26, 28, 29, Sept. 3,4,6,8-13, 15-18, 20, 22-27, 30, Oct. 
1-4, 6-11, 13-16, 18, 20-25, 27-31, Nov. 1, 3-8, 10-15, 17-22, 24-29, Dec. 
1-6,8-13, 15-18,20,22-27,30,31. 

1863: Jan. 1, 3, 7-10, 13-17, 19-24, 26-31 , Feb. 2-7, 9-14, 16-21 , 23-28, Mar. 2-7, 
9-14, 16-21, 23-27, 30, 31, Apr. 1-4,6-11, 13-18, 20-24, 27-30, May 1,4-9, 
11-16, 18-23, 25-30, June 1-6, 8-13, 15-20, 22-27, 29, 30, July 14, 6-11, 
13-18, 20-25, 27-30, Aug. 3-8, 10-12, 14, 17-21, 24-26, 28, 29, 31, Sept. 
1-5, 7-12, 14-19, 21, 23-26, 28-30, Oct. 1-3, 5-8, 12-14, 16, 17, 19-24, 
26-31, Nov. 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12-14, 16-19, 21, 23-26, 28, 30, Dec. 1, 2, 4, 5, 
7-10,12,14-19,21-25,28-31. 

1864: Jan. 1,4-9, 11-16, 18-23, 25-30, Feb. 1,2,4-6,8-13, 16-19, 22-27, 29, Mar. 
1-5, 7-12, 14-18, 21-23, 25, 26, 28-31, Apr. 1, 2,4-6, 8, 11-16, 18-22,25, 
26, 28, May 2-4,6, 7, 9-14, 16-21, 23-28, 30, 31, June 11, 24, 25, 27-30, 
July 1, 2,4, 6-9, 12-16, 19-23, 25-30, Aug. 1-6,8-13, 15-20,22-27,30,31, 
Sept. 15, 17, 20-23, 26-30, Oct. 1, 3-5, 8, 10-12 14, 15, 18-22,25-27,29, 
Nov. 12, 14-16, 18, 19, 21-26, 30, Dec. 1-3, 5, 13. 14, 16, 19. 

Note: This file includes some evening editions, some morning editions. Issues for 
June 15 and 16, 1863, entitled Daily Savannah Republican. 
May 7, 1863, misdated May 6. 
Sept. 30, 1864, misdated Sept. 29. 
Dec. 5, 1 864, misdated Dec. 4. 

See also Savannah Weekly Republican. 

Savannah Weekly Morning News. Savannah, Ga., 1862. 

1862: May 31. 

See also Daily Morning News. 

Savannali Weekly Republican. Savannah, Ga., 1862. 

1862: May 10, 24, 31, June 7, 14, 28, July 5, 19, 26, Aug. 9. 23, Sept. 13,20,27, 
Oct. 4, 11,25. 

Southern Confederacy. Atlanta, Ga., 1863. 
1863: Oct. 13. 

Southern Field and Fireside, Augusta, 1862-64. 

1862 
1863 
1864 



Feb. 8. 

Mar. 21,Apr.4, 25,Sept. 19. 

Jan. 30, Mar. 6, 19, Apr. 30. 



The Southern Literary Messenger. Richmond, Va., 1861 
1861: Oct. (v. 33, no. 4) 



24 



CONFEDERATE IMPRINTS IN THE LIBRARY OF THE GEORGIA 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY RECORDED BY THE NUMBERS OF 

CONIEDERA TE IMPRINTS OR MORE CONEEDERA TE /M PR /NTS 

(Plain numbers are references to Confederate Imprints; 
numbers followed by an R or by a dash and another 
number are references to Mure Confederate Imprints.) 



15 


236 


16 (lOOp.) 


248 


19 


252 


20 


265 


21 


274 


22 


277 


23 


278 


24 


280 


31 


281 


42 


282 


43 


283 


44 


284 


60 


286 


61 


287 


66 


289 


72 


296 


73 


298 


77 


302 


87 


304 


89 


305 


90 


308 


102 


309 


110 


313 


130 


314 


141 


315 


161 


316 


164 


318 


167 


319 


172 


320 


180 


321 


183 


322 


191 


323 


192-1 


324 


196 


325 


203 


329 


204 


334 


216 


336 


219 


339 


222 


340 


227 


342 


230 


346 


232 


347 



348 


439 


349 


440 


350 


441 


351 


442 


352 


443 


354 


444 


355 


451 


356 


453 


358 


454 


360 


455 


362 


458 


364 


459 


366 


460 


368 


461 


370 


462 


371 


463 


372 


464 


375 


467 


376 


469 


378 


472 


379 


473 


380 


474 


381 


475 


382 


476 


383 


477 


384 


479 


385 


480 


388 


481 


390 


482 


391 


484 


398 


485 


399 


486 


400 


487 


401 


488 


406 


489 


409 


490 


412 


491 


413 


493 


430 


494 


435 


495 


436 


496 


437 


497 



25 



498 






597 






12, 14, 16,17, 


1147 


499 






598 






19,21-25,27, 


1150 


501 






599 






29-31,33-35) 


1151 


502 






600 






724 


1152 


505 






601 






816 


1161 


506 






609 






824 


1163 


507 






612 






827 


1165 


512 






615 






828 


1168 


513 






167 






835 


1172 


515 






618 






836 


1178 


516 






622 






837 


1180 


517 






624 






839 


1184 


519 






626 






848 


1185 


520 






627 






856 


1186 


521 






628 






858 


1187 


522 






629 






861 


1188 


523 






631 






862 


1197 


524 






632 






864 


1203 


525 






633 






865 


1205 (1,2,4,6- 


527 






635 






870 


14, 19) 


528 






637 






874 


1207 


529 






658R 


(116) 


885 


1254 (January 31 


530 






669 






896 


1863; May 30, 


531 






670 






897 


1863; April 30, 


535 






678 






898 


1864) 


537 






685 






899 


1264 


538 






694 






900 


1268 


539 






697 






902 


1271 


540 






721 


(4247 


,55- 


917 


1274 


541 






58, 


61,66 


,73, 


924 


1275 


542 






76, 


79,83 


,84, 


925 


1278 


543 






88, 


91,95-97, 


1066 


1279 


544 






IOj 


M15, 


117, 


1067 


1280 


545 






120, 122, 


123, 


1091 


1287 


547 






125-127,1 


129, 


1093 


1295 


550 






132-135,1 


137) 


1096 


1296 


551 






722 


(7,9, 


10, 17- 


1100 


1300 


558 






21, 


23-25, 


27-29, 


1103 


1301 


560 






31, 


32,34-36, 


1104 


1302 


562 


(AprU 


7, 15, 


39, 


40,42 


,44, 


1105 


1303 


1862; December 


45, 


47,50 


,51, 


1108 


1304 


28, 


1863; 


Janu- 


53-56,58, 


60, 


1109 


1305 


ary 


11,25 


, 1864; 


62-65,69, 


72, 


1110 


1306 


January 9, 


. 1865) 


73, 


75,77 


,78, 


1112 


1307 


577 






80, 


82,83 


,85- 


1113 


1308 


578 






93, 


100,101, 


1114 


1309 


583 






103-105, ] 


107, 


1115 


1310 


584 






109, 112, 


114, 


1116 


1311 


586 






120, 122-127, 


1117 


1312 


591 






129, 131-1 


135, 


1119 


1317 


592 






137) 




1123 


1318 


593 






723 


(1-3,5 


,8-10, 


1137 


1319 



26 



1321 




1546 




3076 


3627 


1322 




1547 




3077 


3648 


1323 




1548 




3085 


3650 


1327 




1551 




3090 


3653 


1333 




1552 




3096 (pts. 2-5) 


3659 


1344 




1581-1 


1(2) 


3097 


3677 


1347(9) 




1588 




3103 


3698 


1348 (3,7, 


11, 


1609 




3105 (v. 1 only) 


3703 


17, 18,21 


,23- 


1610 




3106 


3706 


27,29-31, 


35, 


1611 




3111 


3739 


43,44,48 


,53, 


1865 




3112 


3779 


54,57-59, 


63- 


1873 




3116 


3780 


67,70,72 


,77- 


1880 




3138 


3781 


79,82,83 


,93, 


2256 




3202 


3798 


109-112) 




2273 




3227 


3813 


1349 (1-127, 130- 


2274 




3292 . 


3820 


145, 147-159, 


2275 




3306 


3848 


161-164) 




2276 




3328 


3863 


1350 (1-8, ] 


10-25, 


2282 (no. 1) 


3337 


3869 


27-40,42, 


48- 


2377 




3342 


3871 


51,53-56, 


58, 


2397 




3356 


3878 


59,87) 




2401 




3357 


3907 


1351 (5-9) 




2419 




3364 


3935 


1355 (1-3) 




2426 




3368 


3951 


1358 




2428 


(v. 1 only) 


3372 


3958 


1362 




2486 




3383 


3960 


1363 




2488 




3401 


3961 


1364 




2559 




3411 


3964 


1374 (incomplete) 


2560 




3423-1 


3978 


1390 




2587 




3427-1 


3980 


1411 




2616 




3431 


3982 


1417 (incomplete) 


2623 




344) 


4077 


1425 




2628 




3468 


4107 


1432 




2634 




3476 


4142 


1433 




2636 




3484 


4143 


1435 (v. 2 only) 


2658 




3485 


4144 


1436 




2670 




3489 


4145 


1448-3 




2697 




3497 


4146 


1449 




2728 




3498 


4147 


1518 




2765 




3517 


4149 


1520 




2767 




3526 


4150 


1521 




2784 




3541 


4151 


1522 




2785 




3543 


4153 


1523 




2886 




3544 


4155 


1524 




2898 




3548 


4179 


1531 




2948 


(42 p.) 


3552 


4194 


1538 




2949 




3591 


4232 


1539 




2950 




3599 


4234 (incomplete) 


1540 




2951 




3601 


4261 


1541 




3042 




3612 


4475 


1544 




3072 


(incomplete) 


3613 


4519 (incomplete) 


1545 




3073 




3623 


4520 



27 



4529 
4530 
4531 

4532 
4532-1 
4532-2 
4951 



28 



NOTES 

1. For a brief history of the Society see Albert S. Britt, Jr.'s Overture to the 
Future at the Georgia Historical Society (Savannah: Georgia Historical Society, 
1974). 28 p. 

2. Wymberley Jones De Renne Georgia Library, Wormsloe. Catalogue of the 
Wymberley Jones De Renne Georgia Library at Wormsloe, Isle of Hope, Near 
Savannah, Georgia . . . Wormsloe: Privately printed, 1931. 3 v. 

3. Confederate Memorial Literary Society, Richmond. /I Calendar of Confederate 
Papers, with a Bibliography of Some Confederate Publications; preliminary 
report of the Southern Historical Manuscripts Commission, prepared under the 
direction of the Confederate Memorial Literary Society by Douglas Southall 
Freeman. Richmond, Va.: The Confederate Museum, 1908. p. 501. 

4. Boston Athenaeum. Confederate Imprints, a Check List Based Principally on 
the Collection of the Boston Athenaeum, by Marjorie Lyle Crandall, with an 
introduction by Walter Muir Whitehill. [Boston:] The Boston Athenaeum, 
1955.2 V. 

5. Confederate States of America. Army. Army of Tennessee. General order no. 
214 .. . [Dalton,Ga. 1863.] Broadside. 

6. Ibid. To the Soldiers of the Army of Tennessee! . . . [Dalton, Ga., 1863.] 
Broadside. 

7. Richard Barksdale Harwell. "Confederate Carrousel: Southern Songs of the 
Sixties," Emory University Quarterly, VI (1950), 89. 

8. Boston Athenaeum. Confederate Literature, a List of Books and Newspapers, 
Maps, Music, and Miscellaneous Matter Printed in the South During the 
Confederacy, Now in the Boston Athenaeum; prepared by Charles N. Baxter 
and James M. Dearborn, with an introduction by James Ford Rhodes. 
[Boston:] The Boston Athenaeum, 1917. 213 p. 

9. Willard O. Waters. "Confederate Imprints in the Henry E. Huntington Library 
Unrecorded in Previously Published Bibliographies of Such Material," The 
Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, XXIII (1929), 18-109. 

10. Harwell. More Confederate Imprints, by Richard Harwell. Richmond, Va.: The 
Virginia State Library, 1957. 2 v. 

1 1 . Harwell. Confederate Imprints in the University of Georgia Libraries, edited by 
Richard B. Harwell. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1964. 49 p. 

12. Winston Broadfoot. "Checklist of the Confederate Imprints in the Duke 
University Library," Library Notes, The Friends of the Duke University 
Library, No. 40 (September, 1966) 85 p. 



29 



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